I’m working as half of the studio Platform.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cairn, 210 x 297 mm, Risograph

Cairn exists as a trail marker, the result of parallel, ascending climbs through images from the Rotherhithe Picture Library, a collection of Wikipedia article hyperlinks organised by their elevation and a facsimile of René Daumal’s Mount Analogue: A Novel of Symbolically Authentic Non-Euclidean Adventures in Mountain Climbing.

Similar in the way that René Daumal’s novel abruptly ends (upon his death)—an unfortunate but appropriate finish to a story of a mountain with an inaccessible summit—the material from the Rotherhithe Picture Library included in the book is only a fragment of the entire archive.

In other words, this book is just one entry point to both works (book and picture library), one record of an exploration through the two. Much more exists to be seen and said about both, but the hope is that this project acts as a sort of base camp, a place at which to begin for any interested mountaineers.

Printed and bound at London Centre for Book Arts.


Open Border EU was a temporary installation in Dover, United Kingdom. It consisted of 7 nautical flags that spelled the word ‘welcome’ opposite the English Channel from Calais, France. The project can also be viewed at openborder.eu.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Requesting, 140 x 210 mm, 1 color

Sol Lewitt’s Wall Drawings recreated via Amazon Mechnical Turk: Between April 4, 2016 and April 7, 2016 eighty five anonymous “Turkers” were comissioned in order to create the content of this book. Over a span of eight HITs (jobs uploaded to the Mechanical Turk marketplace) workers were paid between 10¢ and 50¢ to complete a drawing per instructions given through the service’s interface. Workers were linked to a web-based drawing application, or asked to use the method of their choice, to interpret a set of intructions (one of three—Wall Drawing #46, #56, or #295) and submit the result via email, where the submissions were automatically forwarded and uploaded to a content management system.

The average time spent on the tasks within each of the eight assignments varied and were: 16 minutes 49 seconds, 8 minutes 33 seconds, 15 minutes 10 seconds, 5 minutes 18 seconds, 21 minutes 41 seconds, 11 minutes 37 seconds, 34 minutes 20 seconds, and 7 minutes 6 seconds. The effective hourly rates for the eight jobs were $1.070, $2.105, $1.187, $1.132, $0.277, $0.516, $0.874, and $2.113, respectively. Technical issues related to the roundabout process of receiving a job through the Mechanical Turk website, drawing on a separate website, and emailing them with specific formatting were common, but provided an opportunity to enter into communication via email with several of the workers. These correspondences varied from technical issues, wider conversations about Mechanical Turk, explanations of the project, and simple greetings, among other things.

The instructions of Sol LeWitt’s wall drawings were left in their original form, although the particular set of three instructions was chosen as to avoid mentions of color, measurements, methods, and surfaces. All the submissions are unadultered, with the only intervention between their creation, submission, and display in this book being their arrangement on the page.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Interview with an independent bookshop owner, 148 x 210 mm, Inkjet printer

As an accompaniment to an audio interview, the booklet explores the 100 most-recomended books and inventory of an independent bookshop located on a high street. The text is comprised of descriptions of each book’s plot, with an index of all titles at the end.


 
 
 

School of School posters, letter-sized, digital printed

School of School was a temporary publishing exercise that used/repurposed the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Architecture and School of Design identities to post messages critical of the state of education and academic models. Over a period of three weeks the posters shifted from being exact replicas of the university’s existing identity, to slight variations, to complete misconfiguration. At the end of the exercise all the digital files used to create the posters were made freely available via a USB dead drop. A publication was also made to explain the process, feature texts used to produce the messages, and a small amount of copies were distributed around the school.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

School of School booklet, half-letter size, digital printed

School of School was a temporary publishing exercise that used/repurposed the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Architecture and School of Design identities to post messages critical of the state of education and academic models. Over a period of three weeks the posters shifted from being exact replicas of the university’s existing identity, to slight variations, to complete misconfiguration. At the end of the exercise all the digital files used to create the posters were made freely available via a USB dead drop. A publication was also made to explain the process, feature texts used to produce the messages, and a small amount of copies were distributed around the school.


Poster for Graphic Design Festival Scotland competition 2015, 594 x 841 mm


 
 

A newsprint portfolio of work made during the first semester of university, 289 x 380 mm, Digital printed.